When identifying risks within an organization our process to do so uncovers both insurance related and non-insurance related risks. At times that line can blur. As a society we have seen unfortunate cases where alleged tiredness of employees caused significant injury to one or multiple people. The National Transportation Safety Board investigators recently announced (8/13/15) that they cited a Walmart truck driver’s fatigue as the main cause of a crash killing one and critically injuring another.

http://fpn.advisen.com/?resource_id=2438344481111&userEmail=bvillari@cicinc.com#top

The fact of the matter is “drowsy driving” is an emerging risks that affects businesses and individuals all the same. For a business this can create a significant loss in a multitude of areas (employee morale, employee lost time, loss of production, loss of revenue, increase in insurance costs, etc. etc.). To strengthen the case the CDC notes 5,000 – 6,000 fatal crashes each year may be caused by drowsy drivers.

Who’s more likely to drive drowsy?

The CDC lists: commercial drivers, shift workers, drivers with untreated sleep disorders, drivers using sedated medications and drivers with inadequate sleep are high risk.

It’s not only over-the-road drivers that create the risk. It is also air traffic controllers, firefighters, etc. etc.

Every organization should take the appropriate time to look into their own policies and procedures regarding these risks. Performing an assessment to determine the level of risk should be done so proper quantification and planning can take place.

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